How to purchase Online Game subscriptions

Here’s information (that may not be apparent) about how to purchase Online Game subscriptions.  First you register for a free account at https://admin.rocketmath.com for the Rocket Math Online Game.  The next step is to to purchase game subscriptions with our No risk 30 day trial. 

Non-credit card options

 

If you wish to buy subscriptions by sending in a Purchase Order here’s a link to our order form. Or, if you wish to order online with either PayPal or a PO number click this link to get to that page

Either in PayPal or with a PO we will give you 13 months for the one year price, and if you tell us you no longer want your subscriptions during the first month, we’ll cancel your subscriptions and cancel the invoice. With PayPal we’ll give you a full refund if you don’t want to keep your subscription.    

If you ask, I can also manually give you a 30 day free trial–without you having to enter a payment method.  I’ll give you access to all the subscriptions you’d need for your free trial period.  Then, if you wish to continue and purchase we can send an invoice.  Just contact [email protected], with the number of subscriptions you would like to use during your free trial. 

Credit card procedure

Go to the “My Profile” page to order subscriptions.  There you click on + Add Subscriptions on the “My Profile” page of your account.  It looks like this picture. 

No gotcha here–See how the auto-renew is turned off by default?  

After you click on + Add Subscriptions this dialog box will pop up.

This person in this picture has payments set to yearly.  So the price for one subscription is $3.89 for the year.

If you leave it set to monthly, the price will be $.50 (50 cents/month).
To order more than one subscription hover in the box and you’ll see arrows to increase the number of subscriptions.  This box will automatically discount to $2 for quantities of 20 or more and down to $1 for quantities of 100 or more.
Hit the green payment data to pay with a credit card.  You’ll get this Stripe dialog box.  You fill out your credit card info and hit the pay button, but remember, you will not be charged a thing for 30 days.

Monthly, non auto-renewal expires if you don’t act.

Note: As long as you leave the renewal period set to monthly, and leave auto renew set to OFF in your profile, then your subscription will simply end after 30 days.  No matter how many subscriptions you order, your credit card won’t be charged until you login and renew.  So you can try the game for free to see if it’s worth paying for with no risk of being charged for it.  When you decide it is worthwhile, come back into “My Profile” switch the renewal period to yearly, and make sure you have as many subscriptions as you want, and then change to “Auto Renew.”   You can switch it back  to non renew after you renew, but there’s no other way to renew ahead of time with the credit card.  But if your subscription has expired, you will see a green “Renew Subscription” button in “My Profile” and you can click on that to renew.

Yearly renewal gives you lower prices (and still no charge for the first month).

If you are pretty certain, go ahead and set the renewal to yearly and then order your subscriptions.  You’ll get the best price and you’ll automatically get the discounts for quantity.  Your credit card will not be charged until the end of your 30 day trial, so if you cancel before then you do not pay a thing.

 

Get a free 30-day trial of our Online Game

Here’s information (that may not be apparent) about the next step–after registering for a free account for the Rocket Math Online Game.  The next step is to to try out the game with some students by signing up for our No risk 30 day trial. 

Your credit card will not be charged until the end of your 30 day trial, so if you cancel before then you do not pay a thingYou can order from the “My Profile” page of your account with a credit card to order subscriptions. It looks like this picture. 

No gotcha here–See how the auto-renew is turned off by default?  

Leave the renewal period set to monthly, and leave auto renew set to OFF in your profile.

Your subscription will simply end after 30 days.

No matter how many subscriptions you order, your credit card won’t be charged until you login and renew.  So you can try the game for free to see if it’s worth paying for with no risk of being charged for it.

Non-credit card options

If you wish to buy subscriptions by sending in a Purchase Order here’s a link to our order form. Or, if you wish to order online with either PayPal or a PO number click this link to get to that page

Either in PayPal or with a PO we will give you 13 months, and if you tell us you don’t want it during the first month, we’ll cancel your subscription and cancel the invoice. With PayPal we’ll give you a full refund if you don’t want to keep it.    

If you ask, I can also manually give you a 30 day free trial–without you having to enter a payment method.  Then we can send an invoice if you wish to continue.  Just contact [email protected], with the number of subscriptions you would like to use during your free trial. 

Learning to Add Integers

Four Problem Types to Learn

Learning to Add Integers displays problems on a vertical number line and then teaches students two rules about how to solve problems that add positive and negative numbers.
Rule 1:  When you add a positive number, go UP.
Rule 2:  When you add a negative number, go DOWN.

Click to see online lesson.  Doing problems on the vertical number line is more intuitively appealing because UP is more and DOWN is always less.  This makes crossing zero a little easier to comprehend.

Students learn how these two rules play out with two types of problems: when starting with a positive number and when starting with a negative number. Students gradually learn all four types of problems.  On each worksheet they see how to solve each problem type using the number line working with their partner.  Then students learn to recognize the pattern of each problem type by orally answering several examples of each type with their partner (going around the outside of the page).  You will probably not be surprised that there is a one-minute test on each set.   Students are to be 100% accurate and to meet or beat their goal from the special writing speed test for Learning to Add integers (the fastest goal is only 28 problems in a minute).

Students can watch 4 online lessons which teach how each type of problem is solved and why it is correct.

(1) Add Integers Set A Positive add a positive

(2) Add Integers Set B Positive add a negative

(3) Add Integers Set G Negative add a negative

(4) Add Integers Set L Negative add a positive

Foolproof method for finding factors

Knowing when you’ve found ALL the factors is the hard part.

Students have to learn how to find the factors of a number because several tasks in working with fractions require students to find the factors of numbers. Thinking of some of the factors of a number is not hard. What is hard is knowing when you have thought of ALL the factors. Here is a foolproof, systematic method I recommend: starting from 1 and working your way up the numbers. This is what student practice in the Rocket Math Factors program.

https://youtu.be/fDYMRfxtGIc

I have a white board type video lesson that explains this in 6 minutes. https://youtu.be/fDYMRfxtGIc

Bookmark this link so you can show it to your students.

How to find all the factors of numbers
Always begin with 1 and the number itself-those are the first two factors. You write 1 x the number.  Then go on to 2. Write that under the 1. If the number you are finding factors for is an even number then 2 will be a factor. Think to yourself “2 times what equals the number we are factoring?” The answer will be the other factor.
However, if the number you are finding factors for is an odd number, then 2 will not be a factor and so you cross it out and go on to 3. Think to yourself “3 times what equals the number we are factoring?” There’s no easy rule for 3s like there is for 2s. But if you know the multiplication facts you will know if there is something. Then you go on to four—and so on.

The numbers on the left start at 1 and go up in value.  The numbers on the right go down in value.  You know you are done when you come to a number on the left that you already have on the right.  Let’s try an example.

Factors Answers d

Let’s find the factors of 18.  (To the left you see a part of a page from the Rocket Math factoring program.)
We start with the first two factors, 1 and 18. We know that one times any number equals itself. We write those down.
Next we go to 2. 18 is an even number, so we know that 2 is a factor. We say to ourselves, “2 times what number equals 18?” The answer is 9. Two times 9 is 18, so 2 and 9 are factors of 18.
Next we go to 3. We say to ourselves, “3 times what number equals 18?” The answer is 6. Three times 6 is 18, so 3 and 6 are factors of 18.
Next we go to 4. We say to ourselves, “4 times what number equals 18?” There isn’t a number. We know that 4 times 4 is 16 and 4 times 5 is 20, so we have skipped over 18. We cross out the 4 because it is not a factor of 18.
Next we go to 5. We might say to ourselves, “5 times what number equals 18?” But we know that 5 is not a factor of 18 because 18 does not end in 5 or 0 and only numbers that end in 5 and 0 have 5 as a factor. So we cross out the five.
We would next go to 6, but we don’t have to. If we look up here on the right side we see that 6 is already identified as a factor. So we have identified all the factors there are for 18. Any more factors that are higher we have already found. So we are done.

Now let’s do another number.  Let’s find the factors of 48. 

We start with the first two factors, 1 and 48.  We know that one times any number equals itself.

Next we go to 2.  48 is an even number, so we know that 2 is a factor.  We say to ourselves, “2 times what number equals 48?”  We might have to divide 2 into 48 to find the answer is 24.  But yes 2 and 24 are factors of 48.

Next we go to 3.  We say to ourselves, “3 times what number equals 48?”   The answer is 16.  We might have to divide 3 into 48 to find the answer is 16.  But yes 3 and 16 are factors of 48.

Next we go to 4.  We say to ourselves, “4 times what number equals 48?”  If we know our 12s facts we know that 4 times 12 is 48.  So 4 and 12 are factors of 48.

Next we go to 5.  We might say to ourselves, “5 times what number equals 48?”   But we know that 5 is not a factor of 48 because 48 does not end in 5 or 0 and only numbers that end in 5 and 0 have 5 as a factor. So we cross out the five.

Next we go to 6. We say to ourselves, “6 times what number equals 48?”  If we know our multiplication facts we know that 6 times 8 is 48.  So 6 and 8 are factors of 48.

Next we go to 7.   We say to ourselves, “7 times what number equals 48?”   There isn’t a number.  We know that 7 times 6 is 42 and 7 times 7 is 49, so we have skipped over 48.  We cross out the 7 because it is not a factor of 48.

We would next go to 8, but we don’t have to.  If we look up here on the right side we see that 8 is already identified as a factor.  So we have identified all the factors there are for 48.  Any more factors that are higher we have already found.  So we are done.

Can I upgrade from a Basic to a Universal subscription?

A teacher asks:

Can I upgrade from basic to universal? Will I just pay the difference?

Dr. Don answers:

Yes, indeed. If you login to your account you can see a link to upgrade (pictured above).   Yes you will pay the difference between your current subscription and the upgrade. Good decision to upgrade!  Once you upgrade you will be able to get into the drawers of the Universal subscription.  All of these are included:

  • Rocket Writing for Numerals,
  • Add to 20,
  • Fact families (+, -) 1-10s,
  • Subtract from 20,
  • Skip Counting,
  • 10s, 11s and 12s (Multiplication and Division),
  • Equivalent fractions,
  • Factors,
  • Integers (adding and subtracting positive and negative numbers, etc.

I also have completed and added to the Universal Subscription programs to teach computation.  The instruction proceeds in small steps from the beginning skills in an operation up through the highest levels. Each skill taught has a suggested teaching script to make it easy for tutoring.  So far Addition and Multiplication are done.  Each one has a placement test, so you can see where to begin.  Subtraction and Division are yet to be completed.

 

Learning Addition Computation quickly and easily

Rocket Math adds something new: Addition—Learning Computation

After becoming fluent with addition facts the best way for students to retain the knowledge of those facts is by doing addition computation. Rocket Math has added a new program to the Universal Subscription that teaches addition computation.  If students have not been taught addition computation, this program breaks it down into small, easy-to-learn steps that are numbered in a teaching sequence that leaves nothing to chance.  There is an placement assessment that can be given to figure out where the student should begin in the sequence.

Note that the number for each skill gives the grade level as well as indicating the teaching sequence.  Skill 2a is a 2nd grade skill and after skill 2f is learned the next in the sequence is skill 3a.  The sequence of skills is drawn from M. Stein, D. Kinder, J. Silbert, and D. W. Carnine, (2006) Designing Effective Mathematics Instruction: A Direct Instruction Approach (4th Edition) Pearson Education: Columbus, OH.

(1b) Adding 1-, or 2-digit numbers; no renaming

(2a) Adding three single-digit numbers

(2b-c) Adding 3-digit numbers; no renaming

(2c) Adding 3-digits to 1 or more digits; no renaming

(2d) Adding three 1- or 2-digit numbers; no renaming

(2e) Adding two 2-digit numbers, renaming 1s to 10s

(2f) Adding 3-digit numbers, renaming 1s to 10s

(3a) Adding a 1-digit number to a teen number, under 20

(3b) Adding two 2- or 3-digit numbers; renaming 10s to 100s

(3c) Adding 3-digit numbers; renaming twice

(3d) Adding three 2-digit numbers; renaming sums under 20

(3e) Adding four multi-digit numbers; renaming, sums under 20

(4a) Adding a 1-digit number to a teen number, over 20

(4b) Adding three 2-digit numbers, sums over 20

(4c) Adding four or five multi-digit numbers, sums over 20

For each skill there is a suggested Teaching Script giving the teacher/tutor/parent consistent (across all the skills we use the same explanation) language of instruction on how to do the skill.  The script helps walk the student through the computation process.  For the teacher, in addition to the script, there are answer keys for the five worksheets provided for each skill.

Each worksheet is composed of two parts.  The top has examples of the skill being learned that can be worked by following the script.  After working through those examples with the teacher the student is then asked to work some review problems of addition problems that are already known.  The student is asked to do as many as possible in 3 minutes—a kind of sprint.  If all is well the student should be able to do all the problems or nearly all of them, but finishing is not required.  Three minutes of review is sufficient for one day.

There are five worksheets for each skill.  Gradually as the student learns the skill the teacher/tutor/parent can provide progressively less help and the student should be able to do the problems without any guidance by the end of the five worksheets.  There are suggestions for how to give less help in the teaching scripts.  Thumbnail previews can be found here.

Learn to add and subtract in first grade with fact families

A number of math programs around the country introduce math facts in families.  Now Rocket Math does too!

A fact family includes both addition and subtraction facts. You can see to the right 25 examples of fact families such as Set A; 3+1, 1+3, 4-1 & 4-3.  The sheet shows the sequence of learning facts in the new Rocket Math  program Fact Families 1s-10s (+, -).  Each set that students learn from A to Y adds just one fact family to be learned, so it isn’t too hard to remember.  (That’s the Rocket Math secret ingredient!) 

Learning math facts in families, is gaining in popularity these days.  Logic suggests that this would be an easier way to learn.  However, the research is not definitive that this is easier or a faster way to learn facts than separating the operations and learning all addition facts first and then learning all subtraction facts.  But learning in fact families is a viable option, and I wanted to have it available for Rocket Math customers.

Flash news!! Someone looking for a master’s or doctoral thesis could do a comparative study of students using the fact families vs. the separated facts in Rocket Math. This could easily be a gold standard research study because you could randomly assign students to conditions within classrooms–the routine is the same for both–just the materials in their hands is different!  Just sayin’…

I separated out the 1s through 10s facts from the 11s-18s, because this seemed enough for one program.  It would be a good and sufficient accomplishment for first grade.  I have heard that some first grades prefer to keep the numbers small but to learn both addition and subtraction–so this program accomplishes that.

I added Fact Families 1s-10s (+, -) to the Universal subscription in April of 2017 bringing the total number of programs in the Universal subscription to 14 (the basic four operations and ten more!).  By the fall of the 2017 school year I should have the rest of the Fact Familes in addition and subtraction available.  [In time for you to do that gold standard research study!]  The rest of the addition and subtraction fact families, which students could learn in 2nd grade, would be the Fact Families 11s-18s (+, -).  As always, new programs are added to the Universal subscription without additional cost as soon as they are available.

I most sincerely want students to be successful and to enjoy (as much as possible) the necessary chore of learning math facts to automaticity. Please give me feedback when you use this new program, Fact Families 1s-10s (+, -),  as to how it goes for the students.

The best sequence for Rocket Math programs

Teachers ask in what sequence they should teach the various Rocket Math programs.  The basic programs of Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division (1s-9s) have priority and must be mastered by all students.  The rest of the programs are optional and should be offered to students once the basics have been mastered and only then. The only exception would be in a school where Kindergarteners did not get a chance to learn how to quickly and easily write numerals, through using the Rocket Writing for Numerals program.  In that case, you might take the first two months of the first grade year to run students through Rocket Writing for Numerals before beginning Addition (1s-9s).

Here’s a link to a printable version of the graphic above.

If first grade students are taking all year to get through sets A-Z in Addition, they need some extra help.  You should intervene to help students who take more than a week to pass a level.  Often they need to practice better or with a better partner.  Some may need to practice a second time during the day or at home in the evening.  First grade students who finish the 1s-9s can move on to the Add to 20 program for the remainder of the year.

Second grade students must have completed Addition before starting on Subtraction (1s-9s).  They can also test out of Addition through the Placement Probes.  Second graders who can not test out of  Addition in first grade or didn’t complete it in first grade, for them Addition has priority.  Only after getting through Set Z of Addition should they move into Subtraction.  Second grade students who complete Addition and Subtraction 1s-9s can move on to Subtract from 20.  Students who finish Subtract from 20 can do Skip Counting, which does a great job of preparing students to learn multiplication facts.

In third grade multiplication has priority, even if students have not mastered addition and subtraction.  Multiplication facts are so integral to the rest of higher math that students are even more crippled without multiplication facts than they are having to count addition and subtraction problems on their fingers.  So do Multiplication first, then if there’s time students who need to do so can go back and master Addition and Subtraction.  Once all three of these basic operations are under their belt students can go on to 10s, 11s, 12s in Multiplication.  If that is done and there is still some school year left I’d recommend the Factors program next.

In fourth grade students need to have completed Multiplication before going on to Division.  If they complete Division they can go on to 10s, 11s, 12s Division, followed by Factors.  Or if you prefer they could do 10s, 11s, 12s Multiplication.

By fifth grade students should have completed all four basic operations (1s-9s).  If students have not completed these basics (and cannot test out of them with the Placement Probes) then the sequence they should follow is Multiplication, followed by Division, then go back and complete Addition followed by Subtraction.   The same recommendations hold for students in any grade after fifth.

Once students have mastered the basics (1s-9s add, subtract, multiply, divide) the supplemental pre-algebra programs are recommended.  These will help more than learning the 10s, 11s, 12s facts.  I would recommend this order: Factors, followed by Equivalent Fractions, followed by Learning to Add Integers, Learning to Subtract Integers or Mixed Integers.